Asian Dynamics Initiative Conference June 2018

The film Vertigo (1958) by Alfred Hitchcock is a great representation of the different definitions that the term vertigo can embody. It plays with the perception of truth and reality through the physical perception of space, that is, through heights and addresses:
1. fear of heights and fear of falling
2. giddiness of falling in love
3. reversal of truth and perception of reality

Vertigo is therefore a very ambivalent term that can refer to both experiences of pleasure and discomfort, and experiences that we sense very concretely in our body, whether that is in our stomach, in our head, in the pounding of our heart, in the weakening of our knees, etc.

I came to this idea of Vertigo through a pattern that I noticed in some important colonial and postcolonial literature, where this major shocking experiences are accompanied by a physical sense of vertigo. In a text called Mirages of Paris (Ousmane Diop Socé, 1937), a Black man travels to France and in the metro, he is called out by a young white boy. The boy says to his mother, “Look, a Black man!” In response, the mother of course, extremely embarrassed, tells her son, “Shush don’t say that! Say hello to him instead!” In this identification, and the dismissal of it, the narrator of the text immediately feels dizzy, suffocating, and a sense of imbalance. There is something ungenuine about the whole situation. This metro encounter is very similar to something Frantz Fanon mentions in the fifth chapter of Black Skin White Masks (trans. 1967) about the Black man being recognized as such, and the Black man seeing himself for the first time as he is ‘interpolated,’ if you will. And of course, if you’ve read Césaire’s Cahier du retour au pays natal (1939)you know that Césaire documents almost exactly the same experience.

These intertextual references to imbalance and vertigo really struck me, and I found this conference an excellent opportunity to explore this further through a panel. The panel I organized focuses firstly on reversal and disruption and then how that disruption is localized onto and through the body. It’s as if the body has more to say than we can know ourselves. I wrote about nausea, and traced colonial travel in Pham Quynh’s 1922 voyage to France and in Albert de Teneuille/ Truong Dinh Tri’s Ba Dam (1930) that incites this physical and ethical nausea.

 

In the occasion of the Asian Dynamics Initiative’s (at the University of Copenhagen) tenth annual conference this past June, on the Transitions and Disruptions in Asia, vertigo seems to be a very appropriate discussion starter for its chosen thematics.

See our ADI Conference pamphlet for an idea of the discussions held in our panel.

P.S. To cap the conference off serendipitously, I was able to take a thirty minute train to see writer and poet duo Nhã Ca and Trần Dạ Từ in Malmö, Sweden. Sometimes I ask myself how I am so lucky to find myself in the right place at the right times.

Advertisements

ACLA Annual Meeting 2018

My first time at the ACLA and I was extremely impressed with the productivity of the format of the ‘conference streams.’ Rather than meeting with panelists for a short 2 hour session, the format allowed us to meet over the course of three days and carry ongoing discussion of cultural productions in the Southeast Asian diaspora. I met such interesting people with important interventions, including Melissa Chan’s (USC) reading of surveillance in Midi Z’s films, and Alexandra Kurmann’s (Macquerie U) budding theoretical framework of transdiasporic comparisons/relationships.  Tuan Hoang (Pepperdine U) is working on Vietnamese refugee literature in Vietnamese, Leslie Barnes (Australia National U) and Catherine Nguyen (UCLA) on French graphic novels and Zach Goh on Chinese identity in Southeast Asia. Our overarching questions included multiplicity of history and the definition/delineation of diaspora. Overall, I connected with some prospective collaborators – perhaps more on a Vietnamese Francophone Scholars’ Collective soon?

I presented a paper on Đỗ Khiêm, Vietnamese travel writing, and the critique of arrested temporality through scholarship that lingers only on nostalgia and a relationship to the past. Đỗ Khiêm’s work traces an itinerant, undefined trajectory which calls for a valorization of the present, never looking back after going but also never planning where to next. I was very lucky to include in my presentation quotes from our correspondence in February!

See our Seminar Brochure for a full list of presenters and really excellent work!

 

Congrès Asie – June 26-28

No other way to end my 13 months in Paris than a conference to validate some research I’ve done this year. We are also (softly) kicking off the Congrès with a huge get-together among Vietnamese studies folks, à Paris!

I will be presenting alongside Phuong Ngoc Nguyen, Anh Tuan Cam, Amandine Dabat, Thi Sinh Ninh, Thi Quynh Tram Nong, Thi Phuong Hoa Tran, Liem Vu Duc, & Will Pore

Asian modernity. The case of Vietnam in the French period
Monday, June 26, 2pm-5:30pm

“…It is a question of asking the question of modernity, both its understanding among the different groups in the colonized Vietnamese society, the channels and the modes of transfer in order to better study the ideas retained and assimilated, adapted according to needs And interest, etc.
‘Modernity’ will be approached from a wide range of fields: intellectual and literary, educational and technological, religious and intimate.

Access the full program here.

The Publishing Sphere: Ecosystems of Contemporary Literatures

“The traditional idea of the solitary author in direct contact with his editor, and speaking in absentia to an anonymous public is obsolete. In recent years an abundance of literary practices – performances, public readings, sound and visual work and new public spaces– have emerged, forming a vibrant artistic and political “publishing sphere.” If it is true that the imaginary of modern literature is constitutive of the fantasy of a “good” public sphere of democracy then we must find what kind of societies are emerging from the publishing sphere we are faced with today.”

Lionel Ruffel is at it again with another project at the Haus de Kulturen der Welt in Berlin! Learn more about the project I helped organize & translate for here. 

Theory Now – Réengager la pensée

New project in Paris: I am fortunate this semester to assist Professor Lionel Ruffel (Université Paris 8) in his latest project, a four-day event called “Theory Now – Réengager la pensée.” This is in part a manifestation of his larger research concerning ideas of the contemporary.
theorynow_bandeaufbsn-4
“Theory Now” is an invitation not only to intellectuals and academics, but to the general public to rethink how theory can occur and be conceptualized outside of academic contexts, namely traditional forms of publishing, writing, conferences, etc. Taking place at La Colonie, a space that is itself hybrid in nature, part café, part bar, part workshop, this four-day event will include performances, discussions, workshops, exchange and encounters.

You can learn more about the event on: clab.hypotheses.org …and by checking back here occasionally as I will also be posting updates.